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Thecourt concluded that. the court still retained discretion to exclude the bail record if its admission would render the trial unfair. Consider this prominent example, which illustrates why unequivocal guilty-plea confessions serve these values better than equivocal Alford and nolo pleas: In the 1970's, Kathleen Soliah belonged to the Symbionese Liberation Army, a radical San Francisco group that kidnapped Patricia Hearst and tried to kill government officials.
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Justice Blackmun indicated that, at least in some respects, trial judges may continue to admit scientific evidence more cautiously and restrictively. Other Provisions Respecting Search Warrants, Preservation Orders and Production Orders 487.1 (1) Where a peace officer believes that an indictable offence has been committed and that it would be impracticable to appear personally before a justice to make application for a warrant in accordance with section 256 or 487, the peace officer may submit an information on oath by telephone or other means of telecommunication to a justice designated for the purpose by the chief judge of the provincial court having jurisdiction in the matter. (2) An information submitted by telephone or other means of telecommunication, other than a means of telecommunication that produces a writing, shall be on oath and shall be recorded verbatim by the justice, who shall, as soon as practicable, cause to be filed, with the clerk of the court for the territorial division in which the warrant is intended for execution, the record or a transcription of it, certified by the justice as to time, date and contents. (2.1) The justice who receives an information submitted by a means of telecommunication that produces a writing shall, as soon as practicable, cause to be filed, with the clerk of the court for the territorial division in which the warrant is intended for execution, the information certified by the justice as to time and date of receipt. (3) For the purposes of subsection (2), an oath may be administered by telephone or other means of telecommunication. (3.1) A peace officer who uses a means of telecommunication referred to in subsection (2.1) may, instead of swearing an oath, make a statement in writing stating that all matters contained in the information are true to his or her knowledge and belief and such a statement is deemed to be a statement made under oath. (a) a statement of the circumstances that make it impracticable for the peace officer to appear personally before a justice; (b) a statement of the indictable offence alleged, the place or premises to be searched and the items alleged to be liable to seizure; (c) a statement of the peace officer’s grounds for believing that items liable to seizure in respect of the offence alleged will be found in the place or premises to be searched; and (d) a statement as to any prior application for a warrant under this section or any other search warrant, in respect of the same matter, of which the peace officer has knowledge. (b) discloses reasonable grounds for dispensing with an information presented personally and in writing, and (c) discloses reasonable grounds, in accordance with subsection 256(1) or paragraph 487(1) (a), (b) or (c), as the case may be, for the issuance of a warrant in respect of an indictable offence, may issue a warrant to a peace officer conferring the same authority respecting search and seizure as may be conferred by a warrant issued by a justice before whom the peace officer appears personally pursuant to subsection 256(1) or 487(1), as the case may be, and may require that the warrant be executed within such time period as the justice may order. (6) Where a justice issues a warrant by telephone or other means of telecommunication, other than a means of telecommunication that produces a writing, (a) the justice shall complete and sign the warrant in Form 5.1, noting on its face the time, date and place of issuance; (b) the peace officer, on the direction of the justice, shall complete, in duplicate, a facsimile of the warrant in Form 5.1, noting on its face the name of the issuing justice and the time, date and place of issuance; and (c) the justice shall, as soon as practicable after the warrant has been issued, cause the warrant to be filed with the clerk of the court for the territorial division in which the warrant is intended for execution. (6.1) Where a justice issues a warrant by a means of telecommunication that produces a writing, (a) the justice shall complete and sign the warrant in Form 5.1, noting on its face the time, date and place of issuance; (c) the peace officer shall procure another facsimile of the warrant; and (d) the justice shall, as soon as practicable after the warrant has been issued, cause the warrant to be filed with the clerk of the court for the territorial division in which the warrant is intended for execution. (7) A peace officer who executes a warrant issued by telephone or other means of telecommunication, other than a warrant issued pursuant to subsection 256(1), shall, before entering the place or premises to be searched or as soon as practicable thereafter, give a facsimile of the warrant to any person present and ostensibly in control of the place or premises. (8) A peace officer who, in any unoccupied place or premises, executes a warrant issued by telephone or other means of telecommunication, other than a warrant issued pursuant to subsection 256(1), shall, on entering the place or premises or as soon as practicable thereafter, cause a facsimile of the warrant to be suitably affixed in a prominent place within the place or premises. (9) A peace officer to whom a warrant is issued by telephone or other means of telecommunication shall file a written report with the clerk of the court for the territorial division in which the warrant was intended for execution as soon as practicable but within a period not exceeding seven days after the warrant has been executed, which report shall include (a) a statement of the time and date the warrant was executed or, if the warrant was not executed, a statement of the reasons why it was not executed; (b) a statement of the things, if any, that were seized pursuant to the warrant and the location where they are being held; and (c) a statement of the things, if any, that were seized in addition to the things mentioned in the warrant and the location where they are being held, together with a statement of the peace officer’s grounds for believing that those additional things had been obtained by, or used in, the commission of an offence. (10) The clerk of the court shall, as soon as practicable, cause the report, together with the information and the warrant to which it pertains, to be brought before a justice to be dealt with, in respect of the things seized referred to in the report, in the same manner as if the things were seized pursuant to a warrant issued, on an information presented personally by a peace officer, by that justice or another justice for the same territorial division. (11) In any proceeding in which it is material for a court to be satisfied that a search or seizure was authorized by a warrant issued by telephone or other means of telecommunication, the absence of the information or warrant, signed by the justice and carrying on its face a notation of the time, date and place of issuance, is, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, proof that the search or seizure was not authorized by a warrant issued by telephone or other means of telecommunication. 487.11 A peace officer, or a public officer who has been appointed or designated to administer or enforce any federal or provincial law and whose duties include the enforcement of this or any other Act of Parliament, may, in the course of his or her duties, exercise any of the powers described in subsection 487(1) or 492.1(1) without a warrant if the conditions for obtaining a warrant exist but by reason of exigent circumstances it would be impracticable to obtain a warrant. 487.2 If a search warrant is issued under section 487 or 487.1 or a search is made under such a warrant, every one who publishes in any document, or broadcasts or transmits in any way, any information with respect to (a) the location of the place searched or to be searched, or (b) the identity of any person who is or appears to occupy or be in possession or control of that place or who is suspected of being involved in any offence in relation to which the warrant was issued, without the consent of every person referred to in paragraph (b) is, unless a charge has been laid in respect of any offence in relation to which the warrant was issued, guilty of an offence punishable on summary conviction. 487.3 (1) On application made at the time an application is made for a warrant under this or any other Act of Parliament, an order under any of sections 487.013 to 487.018 or an authorization under section 529 or 529.4, or at a later time, a justice, a judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction or a judge of the Court of Quebec may make an order prohibiting access to, and the disclosure of, any information relating to the warrant, order or authorization on the ground that (a) the ends of justice would be subverted by the disclosure for one of the reasons referred to in subsection (2) or the information might be used for an improper purpose; and (b) the reason referred to in paragraph (a) outweighs in importance the access to the information. (i) compromise the identity of a confidential informant, (ii) compromise the nature and extent of an ongoing investigation, (iii) endanger a person engaged in particular intelligence-gathering techniques and thereby prejudice future investigations in which similar techniques would be used, or (iv) prejudice the interests of an innocent person; and (b) for any other sufficient reason. (3) Where an order is made under subsection (1), all documents relating to the application shall, subject to any terms and conditions that the justice or judge considers desirable in the circumstances, including, without limiting the generality of the foregoing, any term or condition concerning the duration of the prohibition, partial disclosure of a document, deletion of any information or the occurrence of a condition, be placed in a packet and sealed by the justice or judge immediately on determination of the application, and that packet shall be kept in the custody of the court in a place to which the public has no access or in any other place that the justice or judge may authorize and shall not be dealt with except in accordance with the terms and conditions specified in the order or as varied under subsection (4). (4) An application to terminate the order or vary any of its terms and conditions may be made to the justice or judge who made the order or a judge of the court before which any proceedings arising out of the investigation in relation to which the warrant or production order was obtained may be held. 488 A warrant issued under section 487 or 487.1 shall be executed by day, unless (a) the justice is satisfied that there are reasonable grounds for it to be executed by night; (b) the reasonable grounds are included in the information; and (c) the warrant authorizes that it be executed by night. 489 (1) Every person who executes a warrant may seize, in addition to the things mentioned in the warrant, any thing that the person believes on reasonable grounds (a) has been obtained by the commission of an offence against this or any other Act of Parliament; (b) has been used in the commission of an offence against this or any other Act of Parliament; or (c) will afford evidence in respect of an offence against this or any other Act of Parliament. (2) Every peace officer, and every public officer who has been appointed or designated to administer or enforce any federal or provincial law and whose duties include the enforcement of this or any other Act of Parliament, who is lawfully present in a place pursuant to a warrant or otherwise in the execution of duties may, without a warrant, seize any thing that the officer believes on reasonable grounds (a) has been obtained by the commission of an offence against this or any other Act of Parliament; (b) has been used in the commission of an offence against this or any other Act of Parliament; or (c) will afford evidence in respect of an offence against this or any other Act of Parliament. 489.1 (1) Subject to this or any other Act of Parliament, where a peace officer has seized anything under a warrant issued under this Act or under section 487.11 or 489 or otherwise in the execution of duties under this or any other Act of Parliament, the peace officer shall, as soon as is practicable, (a) where the peace officer is satisfied, (i) that there is no dispute as to who is lawfully entitled to possession of the thing seized, and (ii) that the continued detention of the thing seized is not required for the purposes of any investigation or a preliminary inquiry, trial or other proceeding, return the thing seized, on being issued a receipt therefor, to the person lawfully entitled to its possession and report to the justice who issued the warrant or some other justice for the same territorial division or, if no warrant was issued, a justice having jurisdiction in respect of the matter, that he has done so; or (2) Subject to this or any other Act of Parliament, where a person, other than a peace officer, has seized anything under a warrant issued under this Act or under section 487.11 or 489 or otherwise in the execution of duties under this or any other Act of Parliament, that person shall, as soon as is practicable, (a) bring the thing seized before the justice who issued the warrant or some other justice for the same territorial division or, if no warrant was issued, before a justice having jurisdiction in respect of the matter, or (b) report to the justice referred to in paragraph (a) that he has seized the thing and is detaining it or causing it to be detained, (3) A report to a justice under this section shall be in the form set out as Form 5.2 in Part XXVIII, varied to suit the case and shall include, in the case of a report in respect of a warrant issued by telephone or other means of telecommunication, the statements referred to in subsection 487.1(9). 490 (1) Subject to this or any other Act of Parliament, where, pursuant to paragraph 489.1(1) (b) or subsection 489.1(2), anything that has been seized is brought before a justice or a report in respect of anything seized is made to a justice, the justice shall, (a) where the lawful owner or person who is lawfully entitled to possession of the thing seized is known, order it to be returned to that owner or person, unless the prosecutor, or the peace officer or other person having custody of the thing seized, satisfies the justice that the detention of the thing seized is required for the purposes of any investigation or a preliminary inquiry, trial or other proceeding; or (b) where the prosecutor, or the peace officer or other person having custody of the thing seized, satisfies the justice that the thing seized should be detained for a reason set out in paragraph (a), detain the thing seized or order that it be detained, taking reasonable care to ensure that it is preserved until the conclusion of any investigation or until it is required to be produced for the purposes of a preliminary inquiry, trial or other proceeding. (2) Nothing shall be detained under the authority of paragraph (1)(b) for a period of more than three months after the day of the seizure, or any longer period that ends when an application made under paragraph (a) is decided, unless (a) a justice, on the making of a summary application to him after three clear days notice thereof to the person from whom the thing detained was seized, is satisfied that, having regard to the nature of the investigation, its further detention for a specified period is warranted and the justice so orders; or (b) proceedings are instituted in which the thing detained may be required. (3) More than one order for further detention may be made under paragraph (2)(a) but the cumulative period of detention shall not exceed one year from the day of the seizure, or any longer period that ends when an application made under paragraph (a) is decided, unless (a) a judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction or a judge as defined in section 552, on the making of a summary application to him after three clear days notice thereof to the person from whom the thing detained was seized, is satisfied, having regard to the complex nature of the investigation, that the further detention of the thing seized is warranted for a specified period and subject to such other conditions as the judge considers just, and the judge so orders; or (b) proceedings are instituted in which the thing detained may be required. (3.1) A thing may be detained under paragraph (1)(b) for any period, whether or not an application for an order under subsection (2) or (3) is made, if the lawful owner or person who is lawfully entitled to possession of the thing seized consents in writing to its detention for that period. (4) When an accused has been ordered to stand trial, the justice shall forward anything detained pursuant to subsections (1) to (3) to the clerk of the court to which the accused has been ordered to stand trial to be detained by the clerk of the court and disposed of as the court directs. (5) Where at any time before the expiration of the periods of detention provided for or ordered under subsections (1) to (3) in respect of anything seized, the prosecutor, or the peace officer or other person having custody of the thing seized, determines that the continued detention of the thing seized is no longer required for any purpose mentioned in subsection (1) or (4), the prosecutor, peace officer or other person shall apply to who shall, after affording the person from whom the thing was seized or the person who claims to be the lawful owner thereof or person entitled to its possession, if known, an opportunity to establish that he is lawfully entitled to the possession thereof, make an order in respect of the property under subsection (9). (6) Where the periods of detention provided for or ordered under subsections (1) to (3) in respect of anything seized have expired and proceedings have not been instituted in which the thing detained may be required, the prosecutor, peace officer or other person shall apply to a judge or justice referred to in paragraph (5)(a) or (b) in the circumstances set out in that paragraph, for an order in respect of the property under subsection (9) or (9.1). (7) A person from whom anything has been seized may, after the expiration of the periods of detention provided for or ordered under subsections (1) to (3) and on three clear days notice to the Attorney General, apply summarily to for an order under paragraph (9)(c) that the thing seized be returned to the applicant. (8) A judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction or a judge as defined in section 552, where a judge ordered the detention of the thing seized under subsection (3), or a justice, in any other case, may allow an application to be made under subsection (7) prior to the expiration of the periods referred to therein where he is satisfied that hardship will result unless the application is so allowed. (9) Subject to this or any other Act of Parliament, if is satisfied that the periods of detention provided for or ordered under subsections (1) to (3) in respect of anything seized have expired and proceedings have not been instituted in which the thing detained may be required or, where those periods have not expired, that the continued detention of the thing seized will not be required for any purpose mentioned in subsection (1) or (4), he shall (c) if possession of it by the person from whom it was seized is lawful, order it to be returned to that person, or (d) if possession of it by the person from whom it was seized is unlawful and the lawful owner or person who is lawfully entitled to its possession is known, order it to be returned to the lawful owner or to the person who is lawfully entitled to its possession, and may, if possession of it by the person from whom it was seized is unlawful, or if it was seized when it was not in the possession of any person, and the lawful owner or person who is lawfully entitled to its possession is not known, order it to be forfeited to Her Majesty, to be disposed of as the Attorney General directs, or otherwise dealt with in accordance with the law. (9.1) Notwithstanding subsection (9), a judge or justice referred to in paragraph (9)(a) or (b) may, if the periods of detention provided for or ordered under subsections (1) to (3) in respect of a thing seized have expired but proceedings have not been instituted in which the thing may be required, order that the thing continue to be detained for such period as the judge or justice considers necessary if the judge or justice is satisfied (b) that it is in the interests of justice to do so. (10) Subject to this or any other Act of Parliament, a person, other than a person who may make an application under subsection (7), who claims to be the lawful owner or person lawfully entitled to possession of anything seized and brought before or reported to a justice under section 489.1 may, at any time, on three clear days notice to the Attorney General and the person from whom the thing was seized, apply summarily to for an order that the thing detained be returned to the applicant. (11) Subject to this or any other Act of Parliament, on an application under subsection (10), where a judge or justice is satisfied that (a) the applicant is the lawful owner or lawfully entitled to possession of the thing seized, and (b) the periods of detention provided for or ordered under subsections (1) to (3) in respect of the thing seized have expired and proceedings have not been instituted in which the thing detained may be required or, where such periods have not expired, that the continued detention of the thing seized will not be required for any purpose mentioned in subsection (1) or (4), (c) the thing seized be returned to the applicant, or (d) except as otherwise provided by law, where, pursuant to subsection (9), the thing seized was forfeited, sold or otherwise dealt with in such a manner that it cannot be returned to the applicant, the applicant be paid the proceeds of sale or the value of the thing seized. (12) Notwithstanding anything in this section, nothing shall be returned, forfeited or disposed of under this section pending any application made, or appeal taken, thereunder in respect of the thing or proceeding in which the right of seizure thereof is questioned or within thirty days after an order in respect of the thing is made under this section. (13) The Attorney General, the prosecutor or the peace officer or other person having custody of a document seized may, before bringing it before a justice or complying with an order that the document be returned, forfeited or otherwise dealt with under subsection (1), (9) or (11), make or cause to be made, and may retain, a copy of the document. (14) Every copy made under subsection (13) that is certified as a true copy by the Attorney General, the person who made the copy or the person in whose presence the copy was made is admissible in evidence and, in the absence of evidence to the contrary, has the same probative force as the original document would have if it had been proved in the ordinary way. (15) Where anything is detained pursuant to subsections (1) to (3.1), a judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction, a judge as defined in section 552 or a provincial court judge may, on summary application on behalf of a person who has an interest in what is detained, after three clear days notice to the Attorney General, order that the person by or on whose behalf the application is made be permitted to examine anything so detained. (16) An order that is made under subsection (15) shall be made on such terms as appear to the judge to be necessary or desirable to ensure that anything in respect of which the order is made is safeguarded and preserved for any purpose for which it may subsequently be required. (a) to the court of appeal as defined in section 673 if the order was made by a judge of a superior court of criminal jurisdiction, in which case sections 678 to 689 apply with any modifications that the circumstances require; or (b) to the appeal court as defined in section 812 in any other case, in which case sections 813 to 828 apply with any modifications that the circumstances require. (18) Any person to whom three days notice must be given under paragraph (2)(a) or (3)(a) or subsection (7), (10) or (15) may agree that the application for which the notice is given be made before the expiration of the three days. 490.01 Where any thing seized pursuant to this Act is perishable or likely to depreciate rapidly, the person who seized the thing or any other person having custody of the thing (a) may return it to its lawful owner or the person who is lawfully entitled to possession of it; or (b) where, on ex parte application to a justice, the justice so authorizes, may (i) dispose of it and give the proceeds of disposition to the lawful owner of the thing seized, if the lawful owner was not a party to an offence in relation to the thing or, if the identity of that lawful owner cannot be reasonably ascertained, the proceeds of disposition are forfeited to Her Majesty, or, chapter Y-1 of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1985, unless they are convicted of the offence in ordinary court within the meaning of that subsection. in subsection 490.011(1) or renders a verdict of not criminally responsible on account of mental disorder for such an offence, it shall make an order in Form 52 requiring the person to comply with the in connection with that offence. (4) If the court does not consider the matter under subsection (1) or (3) at that time, the court (a) shall, within 90 days after the day on which it imposes the sentence or renders the verdict, set a date for a hearing to do so; (b) retains jurisdiction over the matter; and (c) may require the person to appear by closed-circuit television or any other means that allows the court and the person to engage in simultaneous visual and oral communication, as long as the person is given the opportunity to communicate privately with counsel if they are represented by counsel. 490.013 (1) An order made under section 490.012 begins on the day on which it is made. (5) An order made under subsection 490.012(3) applies for life. 490.014 The prosecutor, or a person who is subject to an order under subsection 490.012(2), may appeal from a decision of the court under that subsection on any ground of appeal that raises a question of law or of mixed law and fact.
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If the inmate wishes to proceed by court trial, the District Attorney must first agree to waive the jury. The person charged with committing a criminal act is called the accused or the defendant. Defendants may also indicate their intention to plead guilty to the charge for which they were indicted. Today, however, the majority view is that the use force may be justified if it reasonably appears necessary for the protection of the third party. [A] General Rule – Subject to retreat provisions, Section 3.05(1) justified force by an intervenor in order to protect a third party if: (1) he uses no more force to protect the third-party than he would be entitled to use in self-protection, based on the circumstances as he believes them to be; (2) under the circumstances as he believes them to be, the third party would be justified in using such force in self-defense; and (3) he believes that intervention is necessary for the third party’s protection. [B] Effect of Retreat Rules – The Code’s retreat rules have applicability in very limited circumstance here: (1) the intervenor is only required to retreat before using force in protection of a third party in the unlikely circumstance that he knows that such retreat will assure the third party’s complete safety. [MPC § 3.05(2)(a)] (2) the intervenor must attempt to secure the third party’s retreat if the third party herself would be required to retreat, if the defendant knows that the third party can reach complete safety by retreating. [MPC § 3.05(2)(b)] (3) neither the intervenor nor the third party is required to retreat in the other’s dwelling or place of work to any greater extent than in her own dwelling or place of work. [MPC § 3.05(2)(c)] [A] Common Law – A person in possession of real or personal property is justified in using non-deadly force against a would-be dispossessor if he reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent and unlawful dispossession of the property.
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Read The Law-Science Chasm: Bridging Law's Disaffection with Science as Evidence (Dissertation Series) PDF, azw (Kindle), ePub, doc, mobi

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While executions themselves are rare, this latter channel may be triggered fairly regularly, providing a reasonable basis for a general deterrent response. During the period when the criminal suspect or defendant is awaiting trial after obtaining a guarantor or when he is under residential surveillance, investigation, prosecution and handling of the case shall not be suspended. The Fifth District recently considered the application of the public safety exception to Miranda in State v. Accordingly, the “fraud exception” applied to both legal advice and litigation privilege.
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If a standard of “strict liability” is imposed, by which knowledge of impropriety is rendered superfluous, prosecutions are easy; this position assumes that most persons in fact know what they are doing, and therefore only a few “innocent” criminals are numbered among the many “guilty.” Nevertheless, to give the “innocent” an opportunity to explain, should the legislature, as an alternative, make the doing of an act “prima-facie evidence” of the required intent, and permit the defendant to persuade the tribunal that he did not in fact have the mens rea (guilty mind) which merits imposition of criminal penalties?
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Gouras & Amis PLLC is a family law firm that practices exclusively in the area of family law. Schedule 1 drugs are considered to have no legitimate therapeutic use, and cannot be prescribed by doctors, or dispensed by chemists. To require the juror to be sure, beyond reasonable doubt, that the result “80%” is correct, is not the same as requiring the juror to be sure, beyond reasonable doubt, that the bullet came from that gun.
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Williams Jr., former head of the Orange County public defender's office who died in 1981. It is submitted that a model that grants the power to the bench to appoint experts (as envisaged in Regulation 44) should also impose upon the bench a rigorous, formal test in the shape of a reliabilitybased exclusionary rule of evidence such as the one proposed by the Law Commission. If an employer successfully demonstrates that its policy or practice is job related for the position in question and consistent with business necessity, a Title VII plaintiff may still prevail by demonstrating that there is a less discriminatory "alternative employment practice" that serves the employer's legitimate goals as effectively as the challenged practice but that the employer refused to adopt. 128 In some industries, employers are subject to federal statutory and/or regulatory requirements that prohibit individuals with certain criminal records from holding particular positions or engaging in certain occupations.
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Read online A Practical Guide to Pennysylvania Evidence: Objections, Responses, Rules, and Practice Commentary PDF, azw (Kindle), ePub

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At trial, the prosecution seeks to impeach Sweat through evidence of his prior convictions, leading to the following exchange between the judge and defense counsel: [DEFENSE COUNSEL]: As I understand that rule in reading it, it appears to me that some of the case law says that you have to look at whether or not the conduct complained of is relevant to the truthfulness in this case. [DEFENSE COUNSEL]: That’s what the rule contemplates.
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Read online Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984: Code B: Revised Code of Practice for Searches of Premises by Police Officers and the Seizure of Property Found by Police Officers on Persons or Premises PDF, azw (Kindle), ePub

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What type of technology might the prosecution have used to avoid its problem? "We, as defense lawyers in the criminal courts, are forced to deal with some of the lowest people on earth, people who have no sense of right and wrong, people who will lie in court to get what they want, people who do not care who gets hurt in the process. Violation of Miranda is not necessarily a constitutional violation. § Michigan v. Why do we have such a high burden on the government to prove their case?� The theory is that the cost to society of jailing an innocent person is much higher than releasing a number of guilty people.� Also, protection against overzealous police force, judges, prosecutors.� It has less to do with this particular criminal trial, and more to do with limiting government power in general.
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Is possession of a concealed firearm inherently dangerous?� This is a very common statute.� Once you�ve been convicted of a felony, you basically lose the right to possess a concealed firearm.� What the California Supreme Court said was that white collar felons carrying concealed firearms are no more dangerous than just regular folks carrying concealed firearms.� So their answer was no, carrying a concealed firearms is not inherently dangerous because it could be done in a matter no more dangerous than the average schmoe carrying around a firearm.
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